Can Pregnant Women Get The COVID-19 Vaccine?

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Monica

Monica

2021-01-13

Vaccines have come as a ray of hope amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Some countries have already started to vaccinate their citizens.

Does that list include pregnant women? This has become the biggest concern for families with pregnant women.

According to the CDC, “pregnant women with COVID-19 are at a high risk of developing severe illnesses that can result in ICU admission.” They may undergo adverse pregnancy outcomes and deliver a preterm baby. That is why COVID-19 vaccines are also being considered not safe for pregnant women. Experts are hinting that pregnant and breastfeeding women should not risk the health of their children by taking the vaccine.

But, there no scientific study that proves COVID-19 vaccines are not safe for pregnant women. It is just an assumption. Doctors say that pregnant women are a vulnerable population and they should not put the child in the womb at risk. For much clarity, vaccines will be tested on pregnant ladies till then they may have to wait to get the vaccine.

Research published by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists suggests that pregnant women who meet the vaccination criteria should be given the vaccine even though there is no safety data on COVID-19 vaccine use till now.

While pregnant people still have a complicated choice to make now that some vaccines are authorized for emergency use .

Pros and cons of getting the vaccine if you’re pregnant 

Getting the vaccine means being almost entirely protected from contracting COVID-19. If infected, pregnant people have a higher risk of intensive-care unit admission, ventilation, life support, and death than patients who aren’t pregnant, though the overall risk is still low, a November report from the CDC found. They’re also more likely to deliver prematurely. 

But getting the vaccine also means taking a bit of a gamble. Researchers don’t have good data on the risks to pregnant people, though healthcare and public health professionals expect that they’re low. 

If they’re in a prioritized group for access, like healthcare workers and nursing home staffers, they need to decide: Get the vaccine despite knowing little about its potential risks to them, or skip it and risk contracting COVID-19, which is more likely to lead to complications and death in pregnant people.

Professional and governmental organizations have so far avoided taking a strong stance in either direction, though experts say the way the vaccine is made suggests it’s safe in that population. 

So how should the expectant parents who are preparing for pregnancy or who are pregnant choose? As there is currently no disclosure of the new crown vaccine instructions, it is recommended that women during pregnancy should consult a doctor, and a professional doctor will assess whether they can receive the new crown vaccine.

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